O’Reilly Security Conference

Disclaimer: I was a speaker at the conference. As such, O’Reilly Media covered most of my travel expenses, as well as provided me with a Speaker pass. If you think such benefits, nice though they were, had a significant impact on my opinion, to me it just means we don’t know each other very well yet. Trust me when I say that they do NOT… Happy to discuss as needed…

TL;DR: The experience of being part of the inaugural O’Reilly Security Conference was amazing. The content I watched was excellent, the venue/logistics worked really well, and I really liked the “vibe” on the conference. 10/10!

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Source: O’Reilly Media – click for license details.

This longish post is about my experience on the O’Reilly Security Conference. I summarize what I learned from each session I attended, as well as general opinions. I can’t think in prose, so this is mostly in list format. Without further ado:

Format and Venue

  • 4-track conference, held at the New York Hilton Midtown.
  • Pre-conference training and tutorials, an Ignite session, then 2 days with morning keynotes followed by morning and afternoon sessions.
  • Good breaks in between sessions (ranging from 15 minutes to 1 hour)
  • No idea on attendance, likely in the mid hundreds.

Tutorials and Ignite

I attended Jim Manico’s half-day tutorial on “Modern IdM” hoping to learn more about Web authentication and I was not disappointed. He covered OAuth in detail, as well as session management, and recommendations around password storage. He’s a very energetic and engaging speaker, and time flew by.

The afternoon was reserved for the Apache Drill tutorial led by Charles Givre, from Booz Allen Hamilton. Charles took us through the rationale for Apache Drill – basically a SQL-supporting unifying front-end for disparate back-end data stores – and led exercises on data manipulation. Drill can be a fantastic tool for a data scientist to easily get at disparate data sources.  I’m a SQL newbie and struggled with some of the exercises, but that is on me and not on the tutorial. He also based the exercises on a pre-configured VM that has other data science tools. This will come in very handy…

In the evening, Jerry Bell and Andrew Kalat hosted the Ignite talks (lightning fast talks with auto-advancing slides). Jerry and Andrew host the Defensive Security podcast , probably my favourite security podcast. It was a privilege to chat with them. The talks were interesting, ranging from the need to shy away from hero-focused security work, to how we can do better at training/education, to the use of existing intelligence/data sources. Great talks, easy-going format.

Karaoke…

Then there was… karaoke… For those that are not familiar, “slide karaoke” is a fun-filled/terrifying (depending on your point of view) format where someone is presented random slides at a fixed-time interval and the they have to “improv” their way to a somewhat coherent talk structure. Andrew and Jerry asked for 5 volunteers…. and I was one of them….

I don’t quite remember what all my slides were, but there were references to llamas, some sort of potato-based disease, and rule breaking. 🙂  I’m just hoping I made it entertaining for the audience…

Lesson learned: Courtney Nash is a master at this: she was funny, coherent, engaging, … She’s a very tough act to follow, which just happened to be my spot in the roster… You have been warned 🙂

Seriously, though: it was great fun, and I hope others join in. It was a great environment, people were having fun, and part of being in this industry is this sense of community that we build. It was a privilege to be able to take part in that.

Keynotes

On day 1, following the intro from Allison Miller and Courtney Nash, Heather Adkins from Google kicked things off by showing us how some of the main classes of security incidents – be they insecure defaults, massive theft, or instability – have been happening in different forms since the 1980s. After pointing to the increased siloization(sp?) of our industry as a possible cause, she urged us to think about broader platforms, and to design with a much longer timeframe in mind.

Richard Thieme took us through a sobering view of the psychological challenges in our career. Drawing parallels to the intelligence community and the challenges faced there, Richard rightfully reminded us to stay mindful of our needs as individuals and building adequate support networks in our lives.

Becky Bace did a great job of comparing the challenges of infosec today with the early days of the auto industry, and how we can use some of the lessons learned there to improve it. Given my interest in economics and incentives, I was silently clapping pretty much all the time.

Unfortunately I missed most of the day 2 keynotes – I look forward to watching video later. What I did catch was the latter part of Cory Doctorow‘s impassioned and cogent plea for more involvement from us as individuals into the immensely important debate about the very nature of property and democracy in modern society. There are key discussions and precedent-setting court cases taking place now, and many of the key societal instruments we take for granted are at risk.

Day 1 Sessions

Speak Security and Enter. Jesse Irwin led a great session focused on how to better engage with users when it comes to discussing security and privacy. She laid out very well defined steps for improving. If I could summarize her session in one idea would be: have more empathy to your user community. From using relatable examples, to framing the issue positively or negatively, and many other suggestions. Hearing her tell of the adventure of teaching security to 8-year-olds was priceless!

Notes from securing Android. Adrian Ludwig from the Google Android team took us through a data-driven journey into the Android security ecosystem. After reminding us that Android security must accommodate from $20 phones to modified units used by world leaders, Adrian focused on three aspects: active protections made by the Google ecosystem, options available for enterprise decisions (such as allowing external app stores or not), and details about the Android OS itself. He made a very compelling case that the security architecture of a modern Android-powered device such as the Google Pixel rivals what other options exist in the mobile ecosystem (iOS, WindowsPhone). This was one of the best talks I attended.

Groupthink. Laura Mather has had a very interesting career, including time at the NSA, eBay, founding SilverTail (where I had the pleasure of working for her), now leading Unitive. Her talk was not a ‘security’ talk, but rather a look into the issue of groupthink, often caused by unconscious biases. Fundamentally, the variety of challenges in modern security environment should be met by having a diverse workforce generate ideas based on diverse points of view. In order to achieve this, we need to work on the issue of lack of diversity. Laura pointed out specific ways to avoid unconscious bias in hiring, particularly being aware of, as an interviewer/hiring manager, not looking for someone “just like me”. Hiring decisions should be matched on values, not on superfluous characteristics that lead to biased outcomes.

UX of Security Software. Audrey Crane leads a design firm, and made the case for proper UX design taking into account the people who will actually use the product. Her firm conducted research into usage habits related to SOC roles, and came up with a few personas (different from the typical ‘marketing’ personas) and then showed an interface design that takes those personas into account. Her recommendations are for vendors to take this aspect of the product creation process seriously, and for buyers of software to not only demand better software from a usability perspective, but to actively try out any software being purchased with the intended audience.

Social Scientist. Andrea Limbago brought a “social scientist” perspective to the broad issues around information security. She framed the discussion in terms of Human Elements, Geopolitical trends, and Data-Driven Security. The human elements section looked at an structure-agent dynamic (top-down versus behavioural) and advocated approaches to evolving the security subculture. Very interesting, as were the comments around security still having a cold war framework, and that there is a gap on the usage of data within security conversations.

Day 2 Sessions

Are we out of the woods?. Kelly Harrington from the Google Chrome team talked about Web security issues. She covered some key issues – how updates are not universal, how older devices get attacked, and the scourge of what Google calls Unwanted Software – and delved into details about the exploit kits (Angler, Rig, and others), trends of attacks on routers, plus examples of malicious behaviour by Unwanted Software. She wrapped up by sharing a little about what Google’s Safe Browsing API does and by giving actionable advice on web security. This was a great talk to complement the one on Android security. Finally, extra points for her for the Jane Austen references… 🙂

Criminal Cost Modelling. Chris Baker – a data scientist at Dyn – took us through a whirlwind tour of some underground markets and the actual data he found there for pricing stolen goods, exploit kits, or DDOS services. It was refreshing to see someone dive beyond “oh, underground markets exist” into actual markets, prices, goods, and the possible economic issues that exist in those markets. I loved this session. If there was one session I wish could have been longer, it is this one. I’ll be watching the video when it comes out, many times over.

Economics of CyberSecurity. This session was delivered by yours truly. Happy to announce that slides are available here. I focused on how a brief understanding of economic concepts – Marginal Cost of Information Goods, Information Asymmetry, Externalities, and concepts from Behaviour Economics – can help us rethink some of the broad challenges we face. I hope the audience liked it. I was happy with my delivery and did pick up on a few things I want to improve. I really hope to have the opportunity to keep bringing this message to others.

No Single Answer. Nick Merker – now a lawyer but formerly an infosec professional – and Mark Stanislav – now a security officer with experience as security consultant – focused on cyber insurance. Their session went into the difference between first-party and third-party insurance, then delved into the details of what cyber insurance options exist, what they typically cover (or not), and how these products are currently priced and sold. They also covered some misconceptions around the role of insurance in a risk management program, how infosec should play a role when purchasing cyber insurance products, and how a well-defined and executed security program can help with insurance premiums. I learned a ton, and really liked the session.

Sponsors/Logistics/Others

The sponsor area was relatively small (maybe 10-15 sponsors total) but the people I spoke to were knowledgeable and the selection was varied. Not so much your typical security vendor, but more those offering solutions that fit into a more modern architecture view of security. There were options for web app security, container security, source code security, etc… I did not focus much on it, given my role as individual contributor.

The conference schedule and details were available via the O’Reilly app (iOS and Android) and things worked well. One suggestion I have is that the app could offer a toggle for ‘hide past events’ on the Full Schedule view, as that would help people choose their next sessions without having to scroll around so much…

Food options during the breaks were varied and quite nice. I loved that we had sushi available on one of the food stations.

As a Speaker

My “field report” would not be complete without a comment about my experience proposing the talk and later as a speaker.

The submission process was well defined, the guidelines for what should go in the submission were clear, and the timelines were very fair. I followed the process via the website and the questions I asked the speaker management team were answered promptly and efficiently. Major thanks to Audra Montenegro (no relation) and her team.

The organizing committee has been very transparent about what their side of the selection process was like. This is tremendously insightful and helpful for future proposals. I particularly liked the use of blind reviews. Blind reviews help us as an industry increase the quality of the content that makes it into the stage, AND increase the chance of hearing from a more diverse pool of contributors. What’s not to like?

Prior to the event, I was able to connect with Courtney Allen and we collaborated on a short email-based interview (which you can find here). She was fantastic to work with and has a keen insight into the role that O’Reilly Media can play in the security landscape.

Bottom line is: If you have defensive-focused security content you want to present, you’re open to be being evaluated on the merits of your content, and want to work with great people putting it together, O’Reilly Security should definitely be on your short list of conferences to submit to.

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